Offers coming quickly in Irving Park, Sunset Hills, Lindley Park

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607 Woodland Drive, asking $999,000, $312/square foot, offer accepted in three days

The spring home-buying season has gotten off to a fast start, particularly in Irving Park, Lindley Park and Sunset Hills. Two Irving Park homeowners have accepted very quick offers.  607 Woodland had been on the market for three days; the asking price of $999,000 works out to an impressive $312 per square foot. 1104 Sunset Drive (asking $569,000) had been on the market just four days before an offer was accepted.

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309 Woodbine Court, asking $394,900, $159/square foot, offer accepted in two days

In Sunset Hills, we have eight current pre-1950 listings, and six of them went under contract in March. 309 Woodbine Court ($394,900) accepted an offer in two days; 1808 Rolling Road ($400,000), seven days; 2206 W. Market ($618,000), nine days.

In Lindley Park, we have six current listings; four went under contract in March. 2611 Sherwood Street ($164,900) had been on the market two days; 803 Longview Street ($264,000), three days; and 2514 Walker Avenue ($225,000), 34 days.

Elsewhere:

  • The hot item in College Hill has been townhomes in the Wafco area. Four came on the market between February 22 and March 16; all four were under contract by March 27.
  • Listings are at premium in the historic districts. Aside from the townhouses under contract, College Hill has only two houses and a Wafco Mills condo on the market. Just four Fisher Park houses are listed, and two are under contract. An offer was accepted on 700 Magnolia Street ($195,000) after two days on the market. In the newly renamed Dunleath Historic District, only four houses are the market, all smaller homes priced $175,000 or lower.
  • The market for classic mansions in Sedgefield is tight and moving at a pace as stately as the homes themselves. Only three older homes are on the market, all at least 4,000 square feet and on the market at least nine months. Prices range from $425,000 to $2.9 million.

Aycock neighborhood gets a new name

aycock-signResidents of the Historic Charles B. Aycock neighborhood have decided to change its name. The new name is Dunleath, named for an 1857 mansion built on a farm that covered essentially all of what is now the neighborhood.

The name of the home is spelled two ways in historical records (Dunleith and Dunleath); the residents will make a final decision on the spelling later [Update 4/4/2017: They chose Dunleath.].  Just removing Aycock’s name was difficult enough. For those not familiar with North Carolina history, Charles B. Aycock was governor from 1901 to 1905. He was revered throughout the 20th century as “the Education Governor” because of his support for public education, including education for African Americans. Schools and related buildings all over the state were named in his honor.

aycock mug.fwLargely overlooked until recent years was Aycock’s fervent support of white supremacy and denial of rights to African Americans. He didn’t just share the prejudices of his time; he was a leader and force in promoting segregation and eliminating voting rights for black North Carolinians (His words: “We recognize and provide for the God-given and hereditary superiority of the white man.”).

In recent years, Aycock’s name has been disappearing all over North Carolina. UNCG has taken it off its campus auditorium, for example, and Duke has taken it off a dormitory. The Guilford County Schools renamed Aycock Middle School, from which the neighborhood took its name (the school is now named for Melvin C. Swann Jr., a longtime school administrator).

The renaming still leaves the neighborhood with two names. While Aycock was chosen when the neighborhood’s local historic district was organized in 1984, its nomination for the National Register of Historic Places, just a few years later, called it the Summit Avenue Historic District. Actually, it will have three names until enough years have passed that Greensboro gets out of the habit of calling it Aycock.

Acknowledgement: The learned Professor David Wharton provides a detailed look at the history of the neighborhood’s name on his blog, which provided some of the information above.